…because with twenty-four hours in a day its the only fiction you have time to read

From editors and acquisition agents to CEO’s and authors, many hands hold a piece of the pie in determining what goes on in the publishing industry.  But there is one person who holds more power than any other: you, the reader.

As the reader you have the power to tell others in the industry what books to publish.  Will a publishing house invest in 14 books on how to repair a leaky faucet, or 14 romantic suspense books?  It depends on what you buy.  If if you never, or rarely, buy a book you are telling the industry that they really don’t need to publish anything new for you to enjoy.

This week I purchased  6 books.

  1. My Foolish Heart by Susan May Warren
  2. The Prayers of Agnes Sparrow by Joyce Magnin
  3. The Magicians Nephew by C.S. Lewis  (somehow this one disappeared from my set at home)
  4. Crossfire by Jeanette Windle
  5.  Veiled Freedom by Jeanette Windle (already read @ library)
  6. Freedom’s Stand by Jeanette Windle

My 14 year old  used the last of her funds to buy Field of Blood by Eric Wilson, and my 12 year old was told she needed to do some extra chores to earn money if she wanted to buy Lights, Action, Lily by Nancy Rue. 

I have plenty of books at home, a library nearby, and a pile of unread books for review that have been given to me by the publisher. Why would I spend my hard earned money (or in this case a gift card) to buy books when I could possibly read them for free?  I purchased them to tell the authors to keep writing.  I purchased them to tell the publishing houses to keep publishing books by these authors.  Of course, I also purchased them because they are really great books.

Many avid readers, including myself, can not afford to purchase every book they read (at least if they want to eat),  but most of us can buy at least some books.  If reading great books is important to you, then you can likely find a way to purchase some.  It may mean less trips to the theater,   less cable channels, or (horrors) less fancy coffee, but it can be done.  Unless you want to be reading memoirs of a dryer lint collector in the future, do yourself a favor and buy great books.

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Comments on: "Who controls the publishing industry?" (2)

  1. Do you think we really control the publishing houses. Do they really consider what we are reading? Or do they subliminally place certain books of genres the most in make it look like that is what most people are reading. HMM, yes it can be done.
    enjoyed your post.

    • It’s not that they are considering what we are reading, but that they are considering what they are selling. It would make no sense from a business standpoint to push something they know people don’t want. The fact is that a publishing house is investing about $30,000 minimally into each book they publish; if they don’t consider what people want they won’t be in business for long. Of course a house may specialize, but ask a traditionally published author and they will tell you -if they don’t bring in a profit for the company, the publisher most likely won’t likely come calling again.

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